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Have you ever had a pair of jeans you loved so much, you wore them even after they started to look…abused?  My very favorite pair of jeans have been in my closet for years.  They’re boyfriend-style and fit perfectly; I’ve added elastic in the waistband and so they don’t gap like most of my jeans (or require a belt), and I wear them all spring/summer/fall cuffed with tees (they get winters off because they look weird-ish when my ankles are covered).

When I bought them, they had a cute amount of distressing here and there, just little slightly-worn patches.  Well, after several years and hundreds of miles chasing a baby/toddler on my knees around the living room, the worn spot on the right knee has become a full-blown hole.  I continued to wear them most of the fall, but finally realized I looked like a hobo at Story Time one day and so I put them away.

But y’all.  I love these jeans.  And Monday it was 75 degrees here and my ankles were all like, “Where are our boyfriend jeans??  We need fresh air down here!”

I looked around on the internet at a few different patching methods, and settled on this one from Design Mom.  It’s very straightforward and since my jeans hole isn’t a structural problem, just a cosmetic one, I thought that fusible webbing would get the job done.

It took about 5 minutes to do the patching.  I fused a piece of muslin to the back of my patch fabric, then fused the patch to the inside of my jeans (you leave a hole in the fusible webbing that aligns with the hole in the jeans, so you don’t have a weird sticky spot peeking through).  Then I added a few stitches just like the tutorial (literally, JUST LIKE THE TUTORIAL – x’s are the full extent of my embroidery skills) to secure the patch.

Here’s the before and after:jeans patch

It’s a pretty quick fix, and I’m so happy I’ll get to wear my favorite jeans again.  In hindsight I may have made my patch a little bigger than really required – you can see the faint outline of it when I’m wearing my jeans, but honestly, who is staring at my knees??  And I love the tiny little embroidery stitches – I think they’re a charming and subtle detail.

Mending clothes isn’t something I’d put high on my list of “creative pursuits,” but this changed my mind a little bit.  Adding a handmade detail to a store-bought piece of clothing makes it more my own, and as I get older, I’m beginning to appreciate having clothes that are distinct to me (which I why I just completed my third version of the Portfolio Tunic on Monday – pictures are on their way).

Anyway, this is a pin-win!  And tell me: do you mend clothes or just replace them?